The Bukowski Agency - Prizes & Accolades

Prizes and Accolades


ALIX HAWLEY WINS THE 2017 CBC SHORT STORY PRIZE

April 19, 2017: Alix Hawley is declared the winner of the 2017 CBC Short Story Prize for “Witching”, a story about a woman’s struggle to connect with her boyfriend after he returns home from combat.

 

Author Alix Hawley

 


EDEN ROBINSON NAMED ONE OF THE WINNERS OF THE REVEAL INDIGENOUS ART AWARDS

April 12, 2017: Eden Robinson is among 20 authors who have been selected to receive a one-time cash sum from the REVEAL Indigenous Art Awards.

 

The Measure of Darkness

 


LIAM DURCAN WINS THE QUEBEC WRITERS' FEDERATION'S PARAGRAPHE HUGH MACLENNAN PRIZE FOR FICTION

November 23, 2016: The Quebec Writers' Federation presented Liam Durcan with the Paragraphe Hugh MacLennan Prize for Fiction for his novel, The Measure of Darkness.

 

The Measure of Darkness

 


SUSAN MUSGRAVE WINS AT THE TASTE CANADA AWARDS FOR REGIONAL/CULTURAL COOKBOOKS

November 15, 2016: Taste Canada named Susan Musgrave's A Taste of Haida Gwaii: Food Gathering and Feasting at the End of the World the Gold winner for Regional/Cultural Cookbooks.

A Taste of Haida Gwaii (Whitecap Books), is filled with delicious receipes made with ingredients that can be foraged in Haida Gwaii, where Musgrave runs the Copper Beech House and serves these recipes.

A TASTE OF HAIDA GWAII WINS THE BC BOOK PRIZES' BILL DUTHIE BOOKSELLERS' CHOICE AWARD

April 30, 2016: BC Book Prizes named Susan Musgrave's A Taste of Haida Gwaii: Food Gathering and Feasting at the End of the World the winner for its Bill Duthie Booksellers' Choice Award, an award given to the book that is the most successful in terms of public appeal, initiative, design, production and content.

 

A Taste of Haida Gwaii

 


YASUKO THANH WINS 2016 ROGERS WRITERS' TRUST FICTION PRIZE

November 2, 2016: Writers' Trust awarded Yasuko Thanh with the $25,000 Rogers Writers' Trust Fiction Prize for her debut novel, Mysterious Fragrance of the Yellow Mountains.

Mysterious Fragrance of the Yellow Mountains (Hamish Hamilton), is based on the Hanoi Poisoning Plot of 1908 as well as Thanh's own family stories of her grandfather.

 

Mysterious Fragrance of the Yellow Mountains

 


EDEN ROBINSON WINS WRITERS' TRUST ENGEL/FINDLEY AWARD

November 2, 2016: Eden Robinson was awarded the $25,000 Writers' Engel/Findley Award for a mid-career author in recognition for her remarkable body of work and in anticipation of future contributions to Canadian literature.

Eden Robinson works include Monkey Beach, Blood Sports, and Traplines. She has a novel, Son of a Trickster, coming out on February 7, 2017.

 

Son of a Trickster

 


DARRELL DENNIS WINS PMC ABORIGINAL LITERATURE AWARD

June 10, 2015: First Nation Communities Read (FNCR) has named B.C.-born writer, actor, and radio personality Darrell Dennis winner of the $5,000 Periodical Marketers of Canada Aboriginal Literature Award.

Peace Pipe Dreams: The Truth About Lies About Indians (Douglas & McIntyre), in which Dennis tackles misconceptions about First Nations people in Canada with personal anecdotes, history, and humour, will also serve as the official selected title of FNCR 2015–2016.

 

Peace Pipe Dreams: The truth about lies about Indians

 



WAYSON CHOY RECEIVES THE GEORGE WOODCOCK LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT AWARD

June 3, 2015: Wayson Choy named as this year’s recipient of the George Woodcock Lifetime Achievement Award, which recognizes his outstanding contributions to B.C. literature.

The George Woodcock Award is the province’s most prestigious literary honour, and recognizes a B.C. author whose outstanding literary career and contributions to society span several decades. It’s presented annually at VPL in a public ceremony, and is co-sponsored by the Writers’ Trust of Canada and Dr. Yosef Wosk.

 

Photo: John Beebe

 


ALIX HAWLEY'S ALL TRUE NOT A LIE IN IT WINS AMAZON.CA FIRST NOVEL AWARD

May 19, 2015: See coverage from the Globe and Mail, and the CBC, and listen to Alix discuss it on CBC Radio's The Next Chapter.

See also the Quill & Quire slideshow.

ALL TRUE NOT A LIE IN IT WINS THE BC BOOK PRIZES' ETHEL WILSON AWARD

April 30, 2016: All True Not a Lie in It wins the Ethel Wilson Award for best original work of literary fiction

 

All True Not a Lie In It

 


GEORGE BOWERING'S PINBOY SHORTLISTED FOR THE BC NATIONAL AWARD FOR CANADIAN NON-FICTION

December 4, 2012: George Bowering is a finalist for the $40,000 prize, in a shortlist announced today by Keith Mitchell, Chair of the BC Achievement Foundation. The BC Award is one of the largest non-fiction book prizes in Canada.

 

The Heart Does Break

 


CANADIAN WHISKY: THE PORTABLE EXPERT WINS GOURMAND WORLD WINE BEST SPIRITS BOOK FOR CANADA

November, 2012: Edouard Cointreau, President of the Gourmand World Cookbook Awards, today announced that Canadian Whisky: The Portable Expert, written by Canadian author, Davin de Kergommeaux has been awarded Best Spirits Book of 2012 for Canada.

The book goes on to compete against winners from other countries for The Best in the World award. Results will be announced on Saturday February 23, 2013 at the annual Gourmand Book Awards Gala. An awards ceremony is to be held in Paris in the 1,400-seat theatre at Le Carrousel du Louvre, under the Pyramid of the Louvre Museum. This event, held annually, is part of the Paris Cookbook Fair, which this year runs from Friday, February 22, to Sunday 24, 2013.

 

Canadian Whisky: The Portable Expert

 


GEORGE ELLIOTT CLARKE NAMED AS TORONTO'S POET LAUREATE

November, 2012: Toronto's Poet Laureate serves as the City's literary ambassador. As an advocate for poetry, language and the arts, the Poet Laureate attends events across the city to promote and attract people to the literary world. The Poet Laureate's mandate also includes the creation of a legacy project that will be unique to the individual.

The position of the Poet Laureate honours a Toronto poet whose work displays excellence and has written on themes that are of relevance to Torontonians.

 

George Elliott Clarke (photo: Camelia Linta)
Photo: Camelia Linta

 


PAUL GLENNON'S BOOKWEIRDER WINS THE SUNBURST AWARD

September 15, 2011: The Sunburst Award Society for Excellence in Canadian Literature of the Fantastic has awarded its 2011 Young Adult Award to Paul Glennon’s Bookweirder. The jury commented: “This story evokes what the first few years of real reading were like – tumbling into story after story and losing track of the boundary between oneself and the books for a while. A must for any book-lover of any age.”

 

Bookweirder

 


GEORGE BOWERING WINS BC LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR'S AWARD FOR LITERARY EXCELLENCE

April 15, 2011: Veteran Canadian writer and editor George Bowering has received another honour celebrating his lengthy literary career.

The Penticton, B.C.-born poet, who served as Canada's first poet laureate, is the latest recipient of the province's Lieutenant Governor's Award for Literary Excellence, organizers announced.

 

The Heart Does Break

 


THE SWEETNESS AT THE BOTTOM OF THE PIE WINS TWO OF THE WORLD'S TOP MYSTERY PRIZES

October 15, 2010: Last night in San Francisco, Alan Bradley’s The Sweetness at the Bottom of the Pie won two prizes for the best first mystery novel in the world. The prizes were part of the opening ceremonies at the annual Bouchercon World Mystery Convention, taking place October 14-17. In the author’s absence the awards were accepted on his behalf by Kate Miciak, Vice President and Editorial Director of Bantam Books and Delacorte Press in New York. (See www.bcon2010.com.) The two awards are:

  • The Macavity Award for Best First Mystery Novel. The Macavity Awards are named for T.S. Eliot’s “mystery cat.” Books are nominated and voted on by members of Mystery Readers International in four categories. www.mysteryreaders.org/macavity.html
  • The Barry Award for Best First Novel. The Barry Awards are granted by the editors of Deadly Pleasures mystery magazine, who seek out “the best works being published in the field of crime fiction each year.” Awarded in six categories, the prizes are named for mystery fan and renowned reviewer Barry Gardner. www.deadlypleasures.com/barry.html

The novel was also nominated for one more prize at Bouchercon, the Anthony Award for Best First Novel.

This brings to nine the number of awards won to date by The Sweetness at the Bottom of the Pie. The others include:

Alan Bradley has just returned home from a four-city tour of Germany, where he appeared at the Frankfurt Book Fair. His entourage on the tour included: his publicist; a famous German actress who performed dramatic readings from the book, and an MC/translator. Sweetness is #19 on the Der Spiegel bestseller list and is currently selling 1,000 copies a day in Germany.

The Sweetness at the Bottom of the Pie - US cover

The Sweetness at the Bottom of the Pie - Russian cover

The Sweetness at the Bottom of the Pie


ANNABEL LYON WINS THE ROGERS WRITERS' TRUST AWARD

Annabel Lyon beat out her idol, Alice Munro, to take the Rogers Writers' Trust Fiction Prize in Toronto on November 24, 2009.

Lyon won the $25,000 award for her debut novel, The Golden Mean, a tale of Greek philosopher Aristotle's time as a tutor to the young Alexander the Great.

The Golden Mean was shortlisted for all three major literary awards this fall, the others being the Scotiabank Giller Prize and the Governor General's Literary Award.

The Golden Mean

2009 TORONTO BOOK AWARD GOES TO AUSTIN CLARKE

Austin Clarke is the winner of the 2009 Toronto Book Award for his novel More, the story of an immigrant Caribbean woman set against the backdrop of gang violence in Toronto. The award of $11,000 is the latest accolade for the 75-year-old Barbados-born author, whose 2002 novel The Polished Hoe won the Giller, Trillium and Commonweath prizes.

More

ARCTIC FRONT SWEEPS THE DONNER

The four authors of Arctic Front: Defending Canada in the Far North have won the 2009 Donner Prize, which is awarded annually for the best book on Canadian public policy. The winning co-authors, who share the $35,000 prize, are all Northern specialists. Ken Coates, a Donner finalist in 2000, is deanof arts and a history professor at the University of Waterloo; P. Whitney Lackenbauer is also a history professor at Waterloo; William Morrison, is the country's senior historian of the Canadian North and a professor at the University of North British Columbia, Prince George; and Greg Poelzer is the founding dean of undergraduate studies for the University of the Arctic, a consortium of 90 post-secondary institutions.

Arctic Front

WAYSON CHOY WINS HARBOURFRONT FESTIVAL PRIZE

Novelist and memoirist Wayson Choy has been named the winner of the $10,000 Harbourfront Festival Prize, an honour awarded annually to an individual who has made "a substantial contribution to the world of books and writing."

Born in Vancouver, Choy, 69, was chosen by a three-member jury, it was announced on 23 September 2008. He received his cash award on 1 November 2008, the closing night of the 29th annual International Festival of Authors in Toronto.

Choy's books include the novels The Jade Peony and All That Matters, and the memoirs Paper Shadows: A Chinatown Childhood and the upcoming Not Yet.

Wayson Choy
(Photo: Robert Mills)

2008 GEORGE RYGA AWARD FOR SOCIAL AWARENESS IN LITERATURE

Leilah Nadir's The Orange Trees of Baghdad is the winner of the George Ryga Award for Social Awareness in Literature. Sponsored by the George Ryga Society, BC Book World, CBC Radio (Kelowna) and Okanagan University College, this literary prize is granted to a B.C. writer who has achieved an outstanding degree of social awareness in a new book published in the preceding calendar year. Well done, Leilah!

The Orange Trees of Baghdad

2008 ARTHUR ELLIS AWARD WINNER

Liam Durcan's García's Heart has been named the winner of the Arthur Ellis Award for Best First Novel. Congratulations to the author.

Garcia's Heart

THE POLISHED HOE CHOSEN FOR COSTCO CELEBRATION

To celebrate the tenth anniversary of company book buyer Pennie Clark Ianniciello, Costco is featuring 10 of her favourite titles from the past decade. Congratulations to Austin Clarke, whose novel The Polished Hoe has been chosen as one of “Pennie’s Picks” for this special event.

 

The Polished Hoe

2007 DAGGER AWARDS

On July 5, at a gala ceremony in London, Alan Bradley was awarded the Debut Dagger award by the UK Crime Writers’ Association for The Sweetness at the Bottom of the Pie. This £500 prize is awarded to an unpublished work based on the first chapter and synopsis. The winner is selected by a panel of agents and publishers.

 

The Sweetness at the Bottom of the Pie

LANSENS IS A WINNER AT THE BRITISH BOOK AWARDS

On 28 March 28 2007 The Girls was declared the Bronze winner of the Richard & Judy Best Read of the Year Award at a gala event at London's Grosvenor House Hotel.

 

The Girls

CHATELAINE BOOK CLUB PICK

Madame Zee by Pearl Luke is Chatelaine magazine's Book Club Pick for September 2006.

Madame Zee

ANOSH IRANI'S PLAY BOMBAY BLACK WINNER OF FOUR DORA AWARDS

Congratulations to playwright and novelist Anosh Irani, whose play Bombay Black won the award for Outstanding New Play at the 2006 Dora Awards. Bombay Black also won for Outstanding Set Design (Camellia Koo), Outstanding Costume Design (Camellia Koo), and Outstanding Sound Design/Composition (Suba Sankaran).
      Bombay Black, set in a seaside apartment in Bombay, is a sultry, spooky and surreal tale of thwarted love and bittersweet revenge.

Madame Zee cover

WINNER OF THE 2006 DARTMOUTH BOOK AWARD FOR FICTION

On April 28th at the Atlantic Book Awards in Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, George Elliott Clarke won the Dartmouth Book Award for Fiction for George & Rue (HarperCollins Canada, Carrol and Graf in the USA, Harvill in the UK).

George and Rue cover

CHOY INCLUDED IN 100 MOST IMPORTANT BOOKS IN CANADIAN HISTORY

On November 18, 2006, the Literary Review of Canada published a selection of the 100 Most Important Books in Canadian History, which included Wayson Choy's first novel, The Jade Peony (1995).

The Jade Peony - Quebec cover

THE HERO'S WALK GARNERS AWARDS

Anita Badami's novel The Hero's Walk (Knopf Canada), about an Indian grandfather's struggle to raise his Canadian-born grandchild, was awarded the tenth annual Premio Citta di Gaeta, a prize for the best in the literature of travel and adventure in translation. The prize includes a cheque for 3000 Euros. The book was published in Italy earlier this year by Marsilio under the title Il passo dell'eroe. In June in Mogliano Venet,o just north of Venice, The Hero's Walk was awarded the seventeenth annual Giuseppe Berto Literary Prize for the best first novel translated into the Italian language in 2005. (Although it is her second novel, it is the first to be translated into Italian.) The prize included a cash award of 7500 Euros.

The Hero's Walk cover

TRUDEAU FOUNDATION FELLOWSHIP

Novelist (George & Rue), poet, playwright, librettist, and scholar George Elliott Clarke is the second writer to receive a prestigious Trudeau Foundation Fellowship, an award worth up to $225,000 over three years. Now in its third year, the foundation says on its web site that its goal is "to generate and enhance public debate on society's major issues and to provide citizens of Canada and the world with a deeper experience of, and commitment to, democracy" by establishing "a unique dialogue between outstanding scholars in the social sciences and humanities and creative individuals." Trudeau Fellowships cannot be solicited and there is no peer or self-nomination, "so recipients are unaware that they have even been considered.... All were the subject of a confidential and rigorous nomination and review process, and all are being rewarded for outstanding contributions to the social sciences and humanities." There were five winners this year. Last year, novelist Rohinton Mistry won a fellowship. George and Rue will be released in the UK in August 2005 and in the US in February 2006.

George Elliott Clarke

THE 2004 TRILLIUM PRIZE

Wayson Choy's All That Matters was announced as the English-language winner at the 18th Annual Trillium Book Awards. All That Matters is the much-awaited sequel to Choy's first novel, The Jade Peony. The Jade Peony is told from the point of view of Chinatown's first generation of native-born children, as they struggle to reconcile their intense, mysterious community — riddled with secrets and often shaken by dramatic change — with the larger world they first encounter at school. In All That Matters Choy continues the story of the Chen family, this time narrated by First Son, Kiam-Kim. Dwelling on Kiam-Kim’s sense of responsibility to his community, Choy unfolds the Chen family’s secrets in thoughtful and luminous prose, leading the reader to a breathtaking conclusion that far transcends the limits of its time and place, and gestures towards all humanity. The Trillium Prize is awarded to the best book by an Ontario writer published in 2004. Along with the prestigious honour, Choy took home a cheque for $20,000.

Wayson Choy

K.M. HUNTER ARTIST AWARD

Novelist Edward O'Connor has been awarded a 2005 K.M. Hunter Artist Award by the Ontario Arts Council and the K.M. Hunter Charitable Foundation. The awards are designed to support and encourage artists who have completed their professional training and have begun to establish themselves and make an impact in their chosen field. Every year, six awards of $8,000 each are presented in the fields of dance, literature, music, theatre and visual arts. O'Connor was the only winner in the literature category. He submitted a manuscript for a collection of stories, one of which, "Heard Melodies Are Sweet", will appear in this year's Journey Prize Anthology of the best Canadian short stories published last year. The story was originally published in The Fiddlehead (Spring 2004).The anthology will be released in October, and the prize-winner will be announced in March 2006.O'Connor has previously published a novel, Astral Projection (Random House, 2002).

 

 


HARRY JEROME AWARD FOR PROFESSIONAL EXCELLENCE

The Harry Jerome Award for Professional Excellence was awarded to The Hanging of Angélique author, poet, and scholar Afua Cooper at a gala banquet on April 16, 2005.

Established in 1983 by the Black Business and Professional Association, the awards honor the memory of Canadian Olympian, scholar, and social activist Harry Jerome, and the banquet helps to support scholarships for black Canadians. The Award for Professional Excellence is the highest overall prize.

The Hanging of Angelique cover

CANADA'S FIRST POET LAUREATE

George Bowering has completed his appointment as Canada's first ever Parliamentary Poet Laureate. George began to serve in this capacity on November 8th, 2002 and served until November 24, 2004. The duties of the two-year appointment included writing poetry for use in Parliament on special occasions, sponsoring poetry readings and advising the parliamentary librarian on the library’s collection. See his parliamentary website for further information.

George Bowering

WINNER OF THE 2004 DARTMOUTH BOOK AWARD FOR FICTION

"Inspired in part by the Westray mining disaster, Leo McKay Jr.'s bestselling novel Twenty-Six is set in a small Nova Scotia town, where a family is changed forever after a devastating mining accident claims the lives of twenty-six men. In the aftermath of the explosion, and as the investigation into its causes unfolds, the members of the Burrows family are forced to confront each other - and themselves - bringing the novel to its moving and redemptive conclusion."  —Writers Federation of Nova Scotia website

Leo McKay

AUSTIN CLARKE'S THE POLISHED HOE WINS MULTIPLE AWARDS

Finalist for the 2004 Hurston/Wright Legacy Award for Fiction
At a gala banquet at the University Maryland on Friday night, Austin Clarke's The Polished Hoe was chosen as one of two finalists for the Hurston/Wright Legacy Award for Fiction, awarded annually to writers of African descent. In addition to one $10,000 prize, awarded that evening to Hunting in Harlem by Mat Johnson (Bloomsbury), the finalists each receive a $5,000 cheque. The award was accepted on Clarke's behalf by his US editor, Dawn Davis of Amistad/HarperCollins, because the author is in Australia promoting the novel there.

The Commonwealth Writers Prize 2003 for Best Book
"Beautifully drawn, elegantly rendered, a tour-de-force, The Polished Hoe is a wide-ranging epic in which the experience of several generations of women is masterfully realized. Beginning in a chilling statement made to a policeman after a murder, a woman’s voice, speaking in the shadowy reaches of a plantation house in the 1950s slowly uncovers layers of disturbing history. But Mary-Mathilda is more than protagonist, she is a haunting that leaps outside the pages of the novel and indicts empires of colonialism and masculinity; she is the unsettled presence, the un-beheld, the un-held, the fetishised, un-loved. In her singular and final act of self-narration her mind is dangerous, her hand ultimately and inexorably nightmarish. The Polished Hoe is a richly crafted novel which eludes, defies categories; it is variously wistful and agonizing, ironic and sensual; a tragic tale, relentlessly wrought."  —Commonwealth Prize Judging Panel Chair, Dionne Brand

The 2003 Trillium Book Award
“Austin Clarke has transcended the earlier achievements of his already illustrious career with The Polished Hoe by composing a Faulknerian evocation of the Caribbean voice, recounting a somnolent, nocturnal dialogue between a black murderess and a black constable, both of whom confront the racist horror of their own past as they divulge the secrets of both their love and their loss.”  —Christian Bök, Jan Geddes and Lesley Kruger, jurors for the Trillium Book Award

The 2002 Giller Prize
"Austin Clarke's The Polished Hoe is a symphony of Caribbean life and history that arranges the jangle of race and class, rage and passion into an eloquent composition, part slave narrative, part love ballad, part Shakespearean opera, sung against the backdrop of one woman's life. A master of narrative strategies and orchestrations, Clarke creates in Mary Mathilda an evocative and elegant voice that turns the written word into oral performance and fills our imaginations with the smells and sounds and silences of a world seldom seen and little understood."  —Jury Comments

 

The Polished Hoe cover

THE 2003 DRAINIE-TAYLOR BIOGRAPHY PRIZE

Warren Cariou was awarded this Canadian literary award, presented annually by the Writers' Trust of Canada for the best work of biography, autobiography, or personal memoir, for his powerful and moving story Lake of the Prairies: A Story of Belonging.
     "A timeless and universal tale, full of charm, humour, intelligence and, above all, love."  —Michael Bliss, Ron Graham and Heather Robertson, jurors for The Drainie-Taylor Biography Prize

Lake of the Prairies cover

 

 

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