The Book of Rain by Thomas Wharton

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94,000 words
Manuscript available fall 2021

RIGHTS SOLD

Canada: Random House (March 14, 2023)
French Canada: Editions Alto, fall 2023
French ex-North America: Editions Payot & Rivages

ABOUT THOMAS WHARTON

Thomas Wharton (Photo: Mary Sperle)
(Photo: Mary Sperle)

Thomas Wharton has been published in Canada, the US, the UK, France, Italy, Japan, and other countries. His first novel, Icefields, won the 1996 Commonwealth Writers’ Prize for Best First Book in Canada and the Caribbean and was also a 2008 CBC Canada Reads pick. His next book, Salamander, was shortlisted for the 2001 Governor-General’s Award for Fiction and was also a finalist for the Roger’s Writers’ Trust Fiction Prize the same year. In 2006, Wharton's collection of stories,The Logogryph was shortlisted for the International Dublin Literary Award.
Thomas currently lives near Edmonton, Alberta.

The Book of Rain

by Thomas Wharton

IN HIS FIRST ADULT NOVEL IN 20 YEARS, THE AUTHOR OF THE ACCLAIMED ICEFIELDS AND SALAMANDER STUNS WITH AN EPIC TALE OF LITERARY SUSPENSE ABOUT ENVIRONMENTAL CHAOS AND HOPE IN OUR TIME.


“What difference can it make to save the life of one animal?”

The Book of Rain - Canadian Edition

Executive Editor Anne Collins at Random House Canada calls this book a “hugely ambitious, multi-layered, and profound novel.”

The Book of Rain begins in the northern mining town of River Meadows, where a valuable ore’s strange properties create anomalous effects known as “decoherences” that alter reality and eventually force the evacuation of the town. From this beginning the novel follows three intertwining stories:

Alex Hewitt returns to River Meadows years later to search for his sister Amery, who has disappeared while rescuing animals that have been trapped in the restricted zone.

Claire, a young woman from River Meadows who now traffics illegal wildlife, comes to an island under threat of environmental catastrophe for what she hopes will be her greatest prize yet, only to find herself facing a life-altering choice.

In a future as distant as myth, a flock of birds sets out on a dangerous journey to prevent the extinction of their ancient enemy, humanity.

 

PRAISE FOR THE WORKS OF THOMAS WHARTON

ICEFIELDS

“Ice, when it is touched, can sear the flesh; in Icefields, it fires the imagination.”
 — PEOPLE MAGAZINE

“Throughout, the language is often so poetic, it is as heart-stopping as the awesome beauty of the landscape it describes.” — EDMONTON JOURNAL

“Careful dialogue, a steady pace and cool, subtle prose.”
 — NEW YORK TIMES BOOK REVIEW

“Wharton impressively evokes the awe-inspiring majesty, the dangerous but compelling beauty, of the icefields. They are time and movement in a physical form: evolution incarnate.” — BOOKS IN CANADA

“Wharton has ably captured the turn-of-the-century feel of rural Canada, complete with boosterism, a Vicotiran adventuress and teahouses in the wilderness.” — WASHINGTON POST BOOK WORLD

“Wharton writes with a prose style as clear as glacial waters, tempered with brilliant imagery and lucid dialogue.” — CALGARY HERALD

“Icefields is a novel of crystalline beauty from a writer to watch.”
 — TIMES LITERARY SUPPLEMENT

SALAMANDER

“Wharton's style is always flexible, poetic, inventive, and always lucid.”
 — THE GUARDIAN

“A magical tale of books and riddles, castles and countesses.” — ELLE Magazine

“The sort of book every reader hopes to find, earnestly passes along to friends, and returns to in their dreams.” — NATIONAL POST

THE LOGOGRYPH

“It is a book that sends you spinning off into lovely reveries of longing and desire. It is the kind of book you will recommend to close friends and family with words like: You have to read this! You must read this book!” — EDMONTON JOURNAL

“Wharton is one of the few Canadian practitioners of experimental fiction in the vein of Borges and Calvino, and although he has yet to match his mentors, he displays a talent that may well be honed to genius…. Dear Reader, go now and find The Logogryph.” — THE GLOBE AND MAIL

“A book like no other—and I mean that in the most serious and complimentary way possible. However you respond to The Logogryph, you will agree that what Wharton has accomplished is the very definition of literary invention.”
 — LOS ANGELES TIMES

 

 

 

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