The Bukowski Agency - The Orange Trees of Baghdad

Read an excerpt
See also
www.leilahnadir.com
www.farahnosh.com

80,000 words hardcover
Finished books available

RIGHTS SOLD

Canada: Key Porter, Sep 2007
British Commonwealth: Scribe Publications
France: Editions Payot & Rivages, Apr 2009
Italy: Cairo Editore
Turkey: Epsilon

ABOUT LEILAH NADIR

Leilah Nadir (Photo: Jane Weitzel)
(Photo: Jane Weitzel)

Leilah Nadir is an Iraqi-Canadian who grew up in England and Canada with a Christian Iraqi father and an English mother. She has a Master's degree in English Literature from the University of Edinburgh and a Joint Honours Bachelor's degree in English and History from McGill University. She has worked in London and Vancouver in the publishing industry. Since the invasion of Iraq, she has written and broadcast political commentaries for the CBC, The Globe and Mail, and the Georgia Straight, and published a feature article in Brick magazine. She lives in Vancouver, British Columbia, with her husband.

ABOUT FARAH NOSH

Farah Nosh graduated in 2002 from the Western Academy of Photography in Victoria, British Columbia. Her portfolio from Iraq includes the last months of the former Iraqi regime until July 2004. Nosh has also worked in Lebanon, the West Bank and Gaza, Afghanistan, Pakistan, Syria, and is based in New York. Nosh's clients include: TIME Magazine, LIFE Magazine, The New York Times, National Geographic Traveler, The Walrus Magazine. In 2006, TIME chose her photograph of her Iraqi family as one of the year's best photographs. See Farah's work at www.farahnosh.com.

The Orange Trees of Baghdad
In Search of My Lost Family

a memoir by Leilah Nadir, with photos by Farah Nosh

IN THIS HEART-WRENCHING MEMOIR, LEILAH NADIR WITNESSES THE LONG, DRAWN-OUT DESTRUCTION OF THE PLACE THAT BIRTHED CIVILIZATION. WHAT SHE IS DRIVEN TO TELL IS THE STORY OF THOSE WHOSE VOICES HAVE BEEN CAUGHT, STRANGLED, MUTED: THE VOICE OF THE EVERYDAY IRAQI CIVILIAN, LIVING THROUGH FOREIGN INVASION AND NOW CIVIL WAR

  • Winner of the 2008 George Ryga Award for Social Awareness in Literature

The Orange Trees of Baghdad coverBorn to an Iraqi-Christian father and a British mother, and raised in Britain and Canada, Leilah Nadir has never set foot on Iraqi soil. Distanced from her Iraqi roots through immigration and now cut off by war, the closest link she has to the nation is through her father, who left Baghdad in the 1960s when he was sixteen to pursue his studies in England. He never looked back, until now, through his daughter's journey to uncover her lost family roots.

Her father’s most vivid memory is of the garden at the family house: the rosebushes that lined the walls, the date palm that intermingled with the palm fronds, and the orange tree that hung over the roses. His Iraq is of mythical origins; his beginnings are in a garden. But through her cousins still living in Baghdad she experiences the thunderous explosions that continuously rain down upon the country today, and describes losing their great-aunt inThe Orange Trees of Baghdad - French cover the terrifying aftermath of the invasion. Leilah’s friend, photographer Farah Nosh, brings home news of Leilah’s family after her visits to Iraq, as well as stunning photos ofciviliansand their often tragic stories. And just as Leilahgives up hope of ever meeting her family, a surprise reunion takes place.

The Orange Trees of Baghdad is at once harrowing, touching, and painfully human. An unforgettable debut.

PRAISE FOR THE ORANGE TREES OF BAGHDAD

“Skillfully told with extraordinary warmth, her story gives us an incredible and often surprising insight into a Middle-Eastern culture that is simultaneously exotic and familiar, comforting and terrifying ... This is a compelling, touching and beautifully written book that thoughtfully challenges assumptions about a place and a people lost in the miasma of war.”  — BRISBANE COURIER MAIL

“Nadir's strength as a writer lies in her passionate descriptions of the smallest detail. There's a real immediacy, even an urgency, about The Orange Trees of Baghdad, bolstered by her oft-repeated question, What is the fate of Iraq now?....This is a powerful and important book.”  — THE VANCOUVER SUN

“It's hard to avoid the reality, as one reads this poignant memoir, that Nadir's roots are the roots of our own civilization…”  — MONTREAL MIRROR

“Leilah Nadir's The Orange Trees of Baghdad reminds us that Iraq is not just a war; it is a country. Lovingly woven together from inherited memory and family lore, her Iraq is infinitely more vivid, more textured, and more heartbreaking than what we see nightly on the news. In the debates about winning and losing the war, this is a book about what loss really means - the theft of history and of homeland.”  — NAOMI KLEIN, author of No Logo and The Shock Doctrine

“Leilah Nadir's insightful, searching story about her Iraqi roots, family, exile, and survival, told in absorbing and moving language, reveals the great civilization now under assault and the human beings under perpetual blast, condemnation, and bombardment.”  — GEORGE ELLIOTT CLARKE

The Orange Trees of Baghdad is a stunning book, the best I've read in the past year. Leilah Nadir takes us with her in her quest to meet the members of her family whose lives have been uprooted by war. In the process, we are drawn into the heart of the world's most ancient civilization. In the haunting, dream-like pages of this book, we discover that as Baghdad is destroyed, the roots of our own deepest past are being torn asunder. Hypnotically readable.”  — JAMES LAXER

“A detailed exploration of life in Baghdad filtered through the voices and memories of the Iraqi diaspora.”  — DEVYANI SALTZMAN, author of Shooting Water

“A very finely written, deftly crafted work about Iraq that translates this epic disaster into human terms and makes us understand the endless suffering of its people. Touching, insightful and poignant.”  — ERIC MARGOLIS, author of War at the Top of the World: The Struggle for Afghanistan, Kashmir and Tibet

 

 

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