The Bukowski Agency - Midnight Slider

Read an excerpt
See also www.silverdonaldcameron.ca

70,000 words
Complete manuscript due: January 2019

RIGHTS SOLD

Canada: Penguin Canada, 2020

ABOUT SILVER DON CAMERON

Silver Don Cameron (Photo: Majorie Simmins)
(Photo: Marjorie Simmins)

One of Canada’s most accomplished authors, Silver Donald Cameron currently devotes much of his time to his work as host and executive producer of www.TheGreenInterview.com. His literary work includes plays, films, radio and TV scripts, an extensive body of coporate and governmental writing, hundreds of magazine articles and 18 books. Dr. Cameron has also been a professor or writer-in-residence at seven universities and Dean of Community Studies at Cape Breton University. He holds honorary doctorates from CBU and from the University of King’s College, as well as an MA from the University of California and a PhD from the University of London. In 2012, he was appointed to both the Order of Canada and the Order of Nova Scotia, and awarded the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee Medal.

Midnight Slider
The Murder at Mackerel Cove

by Silver Don Cameron

FOR FANS OF THE PERFECT STORM AND MIDNIGHT IN THE GARDEN OF GOOD AND EVIL COMES A DRAMATIC NARRATIVE SET IN A LITTLE-KNOWN NOVA SCOTIA COMMUNITY

WHAT BRINGS GOOD PEOPLE TO THE POINT WHERE THEY WILL COMMIT MURDER?

On the early morning of June 1, 2013, the sea around Isle Madame, off the southeastern corner of Cape Breton Island, Nova Scotia, was calm, the sky a rich, northern blue, and the air was keen and sweet. Off the Acadian fishing village of Petit de Grat, on the island’s south coast, the glittering sea was sprinkled with small boats where fishermen hauled their lobster traps.

At 6:25 AM, the locals heard four pops, widely spaced: rifle shots down off Mackerel Point, at the mouth of Petit de Grat Harbour. Twenty minutes later a fisherman saw something bobbing in the water: the bow of a badly-damaged, half-sunk fiberglass speedboat named Midnight Slider. It belonged to Phillip Boudreau, a notorious local poacher and thief.

By 7:30 the Royal Canadian Mounted Police were on the scene. The island’s grapevine soon reported that the crew of the Twin Maggies had caught Boudreau vandalizing their lobster traps. They reportedly fired at him, rammed his boat, and ran him down. Then they dragged him out to sea, tied an anchor to him, and dropped him in 74 feet of icy water.

The body was never found.

Why did they do it?

What really happened out on the water that morning?

Phillip Boudreau, known as a small-time criminal who had terrorized and entertained Petit de Grat for two decades, was funny and frightening, loathed, loved, and feared. One neighbour even said Phillip would “steal the beads off Christ’s moccasins”—then give the booty away to someone in need. But Don Cameron discovered more: three cases of rape, death threats, violence.

Phillip would also taunt his victims, and threaten them with arson if they reported him. Of those who were not afraid of him, many were indebted to him, while the police and the Fisheries officers were cowed, distracted, and hobbled by shrinking budgets. Phillip seemed invincible, and the worst they could do was throw him in jail, a place where he was perfectly content to be during the cold winter season.

So why would two respected fishermen kill him? Many said that if they had not done it, others would have.

This is a story not about lobster, but about the grand themes of power and law, security and self-respect, which raises a disturbing question for you the reader: Are there times when taking the law into your own hands really is the responsible thing to do?

 

 

 

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